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Welcome!

As a social entrepreneur, I am dedicated to finding innovative solutions for greening business. As a passionate supporter of National Parks and public lands, I work toward protecting these special places from the impacts of climate change and pollution.

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Join me on this site as I report from Yellowstone on the threats climate change poses toward our beloved national parks, and how Yellowstone and other parks are making a difference in sustainability.

"If we continue to increase our emissions of heat-trapping gases, a disrupted climate will cause the greatest damage to our national parks ever."
Stephen Saunders

"A climate disrupted by human activities poses such sweeping threats to the
scenery, natural and cultural resources, and wildlife of the West’s national parks that it
dwarfs all previous risks to these American treasures."
From NRDC Losing Ground Report

"Business is the only mechanism on the planet today powerful enough to produce the changes necessary to reverse global environmental and social degradation."
Paul Hawken
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01/12/11: "The End of the Wild," Emma Marris, Nature

01/06/11: Climate change threatens Sierra, delta, group says," Kelly Zito, San Francisco Chronicle

01/05/11"Environmentalists pick Snake Basin, Yellowstone among most threatened habitats by climate change," Rocky Barker, Idaho Statesman

12/31/10"Yellowstone Grizzlies and the Betrayal of the Public Trust," Louisa Wilcox, NRDC Switchboard

12/26/10: "How a Tiny Beetle Could Decimate Yellowstone," Elizabeth Shogren, NPR

12/21/10: "Once upon a time, whitebark pine . . ." Matt Skoglund, NRDC Switchboard

12/21/10: "Climate Change's threat to the wolverine," Rebecca Waters, High Country News

12/08/10: "Silence of the Pikas, Part II," Wendee Holtcamp, Adventures in Climate Change and Bioscience

12/08/10: "Climate Change Response Strategy Released by NPS Alaska," Alaska Business Monthly

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  • Last Chance: Preserving Life on Earth (Speaker's Corner)
    Last Chance: Preserving Life on Earth (Speaker's Corner)
    by Larry J. Schweiger
  • Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming
    Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming
    by Anthony D. Barnosky
  • Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet
    Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet
    by Bill McKibben
  • Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
    Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
    by Elizabeth Kolbert
  • Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity
    Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity
    by James Hansen
  • Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference (Chelsea Green Guides)
    Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference (Chelsea Green Guides)
    by Jon Clift, Amanda Cuthbert
  • Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis
    Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis
    by Al Gore
  • The Rough Guide to Climate Change, 2nd Edition
    The Rough Guide to Climate Change, 2nd Edition
    by Robert Henson

 

The cheerful chirping of the pika can be heard in rocky terrain at high elevations. Sadly, rising temperatures have diminished the habitat for the cold-loving pikas, who can perish from overheating. A recent study found that pikas had vanished over a 10-year period from 7 of the 25 sites surveyed in Nevada, California and Oregon.

More information about pikas and climate change.

"Pikas may unfortunately be the 'canary in the coal mine' when it comes to the response of alpine and mountain systems to global warming. Their disappearance is an indication that our heavy reliance on polluting fossil fuels is causing irreparable damage to our environment." Dr. Lara Hansen, Senior Scientist, World Wildlife Fund

 

 

A tiny insect has become a serious threat to the mighty grizzly bear. As a result of warming temperatures at high elevations, the mountain pine beetle has gained a foothold in whitebark pine forests. This has resulted in widespread destruction of the trees, which provide an important staple in the grizzly's diet.

More information about grizzly bears and climate change.

"If these trees go, they could take Yellowstone's grizzlies..with them. If we want to save not just the whitebark pine, but the animals and plants like the grizzly bear that depend on this tree for food, we need to move to protect them now." Louisa Wilcox, NRDC Wildlife Advocate

 

 

Climate change and other environmental ills have put over a third of the world's amphibian species on the brink of extinction. In Yellowstone, three of its four species are dwindling in numbers. In Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada, some populations of the yellow-legged frog have been reduced by over 90 percent.

More information about frogs and climate change.

 

"There's no question that we are in a mass extinction spasm right now. Amphibians have been around for 250 million years. they made it through when the dinosaurs didn't. The fact that they're cutting out now should be a lesson for us." David Wake, Professor of Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley

 

 

Bighorn sheep survive in some of the most rugged areas in the country. In the Southwest, the trend toward higher temperatures and lower precipitation could jeopardize the animal's future. Over the last 65 years, 30 of the 80 separate populations in California have disappeared. In the Rocky Mountains, forests moving upslope may further threaten the bighorn's habitat.

More information about bighorn sheep and climate change.

"The harsh environment inhabited by desert bighorn sheep already has them walking on a knife's edge. It doesn't take too much to push them off. The bottom line is that more than one-third of the populations that were once known are gone." Clinton W. Epps, PhD, Assistant Professor, Oregon State University.