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As a social entrepreneur, I am dedicated to finding innovative solutions for greening business. As a passionate supporter of National Parks and public lands, I work toward protecting these special places from the impacts of climate change and pollution.

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Join me on this site as I report from Yellowstone on the threats climate change poses toward our beloved national parks, and how Yellowstone and other parks are making a difference in sustainability.

"If we continue to increase our emissions of heat-trapping gases, a disrupted climate will cause the greatest damage to our national parks ever."
Stephen Saunders

"A climate disrupted by human activities poses such sweeping threats to the
scenery, natural and cultural resources, and wildlife of the West’s national parks that it
dwarfs all previous risks to these American treasures."
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01/12/11: "The End of the Wild," Emma Marris, Nature

01/06/11: Climate change threatens Sierra, delta, group says," Kelly Zito, San Francisco Chronicle

01/05/11"Environmentalists pick Snake Basin, Yellowstone among most threatened habitats by climate change," Rocky Barker, Idaho Statesman

12/31/10"Yellowstone Grizzlies and the Betrayal of the Public Trust," Louisa Wilcox, NRDC Switchboard

12/26/10: "How a Tiny Beetle Could Decimate Yellowstone," Elizabeth Shogren, NPR

12/21/10: "Once upon a time, whitebark pine . . ." Matt Skoglund, NRDC Switchboard

12/21/10: "Climate Change's threat to the wolverine," Rebecca Waters, High Country News

12/08/10: "Silence of the Pikas, Part II," Wendee Holtcamp, Adventures in Climate Change and Bioscience

12/08/10: "Climate Change Response Strategy Released by NPS Alaska," Alaska Business Monthly

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  • Last Chance: Preserving Life on Earth (Speaker's Corner)
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  • Heatstroke: Nature in an Age of Global Warming
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  • Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet
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  • Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change
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  • Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth About the Coming Climate Catastrophe and Our Last Chance to Save Humanity
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  • Climate Change: Simple Things You Can Do to Make a Difference (Chelsea Green Guides)
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« Scientists discuss Yellowstone’s big three: climate change, invasives, land use | Main | Where the antelope roam: following in the footsteps of Yellowstone’s pronghorn »
Sunday
Oct102010

Yellowstone’s future to be discussed at 10th biennial scientific conference

The grizzly bear is one topic of discussion at the upcoming conference. Photo: Beth PrattA description of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) is usually filled with superlatives: at 28,000 square miles, the GYE contains one of the largest remaining intact temperate ecosystems on the planet, half of the earth’s hydrothermal features, the world’s first national park, and first international biosphere reserve. The area is also rich in biodiversity and supports an array of life, including the largest wild free-roaming bison herd in the United States.

This week, scientists, public land managers and others will gather in Yellowstone National Park to help shape the future of the GYE at the 10th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Themed “Questioning Greater Yellowstone’s Future: Climate, Land Use and Invasive Species,” the event is cooperative effort of public land agencies, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations.

The conference’s goal is to examine the changes that climate, land use, and invasive species will bring to the GYE and consider strategies to manage these changes. Tom Olliff, NPS Landscape Coordinator and member of the conference planning committee, says the conference will provide a forum to continue the work that was started on these issues at a number of other gatherings over the past year. “My hope for the conference is to continue down the path of linking scientists and managers on these three landscape-scale issues.”

The 10th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is being held October 11-13 at the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel in Yellowstone National Park. For more information visit the conference website.

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